advertisement
advertisement

The iPhone’s new Siri breaks all of Apple’s design rules—and it’s genius

The new Siri makes IBM’s Watson look like a dunce.

The iPhone’s new Siri breaks all of Apple’s design rules—and it’s genius
[Image: Apple]
沙巴体育手机登录, but pretty much everyone agrees: Siri is a that or as necessary as competing products.

advertisement

沙巴体育手机登录now, apple is making siri seem more essential through design. currently, when you hold the home button or say “siri,” you’re taken to a full, grayed out screen with a multicolored waveform. it’s what i’ve mentally categorized as the “oops” screen—for “oops, i activated siri again.” but when you hold your finger to the bottom of your iphone screen in the upcoming ios 14, apple reveals siri at the bottom as a big, spinning marble that seems to pull from every color of the rainbow, popping out from the rest of the flat interface in 3d (and covering other apps). it’s absolute visual overkill. this is futuristic marvel movie stuff, as if siri were designed by apple in the year 2030 and sent back to the iphone of today.

[Image: Apple]

沙巴体育手机登录this approach defies apple’s normal style of button-up, minimal design punctuated by charming animations. the new siri is the opposite: it’s maximal. it’s spectacle. it dares you to look away. it makes siri seem like the most technologically advanced, most important part of your iphone.

Contrast the new Siri to how Google handles its assistant in Android through a similar gesture: The assistant appears as a subtle gradient, which reveals a line of Google’s four main brand colors. Google isn’t using this moment to look particularly smart or loud; it’s using this moment to fade away.

no doubt we will all quickly adjust to siri’s new look, and what’s overt today will seem bland tomorrow. but if you want a signal that apple sees siri as core to , then look no further than the shimmering, iridescent ai dancing at the bottom of your screen.

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

沙巴体育手机登录mark wilson is a senior writer at fast company who has written about design, technology, and culture for almost 15 years. his work has appeared at gizmodo, kotaku, popmech, popsci, esquire, american photo and lucky peach

More